The Extraordinary Leader, Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders, LEADERSHIP HAS AN IMPACT ON THE BOTTOM LINE

 

Authors quotes:

“Our purpose in presenting these studies is to impress on the reader that the impact of leadership:

-Affects every measurable dimension of organization performance

-Is large, not trivial

-Is extremely consistent

-Has highly interrelated areas of impact

Poor leaders have a substantial influence on an organization’s success.  They consistently achieve less effective results, create greater turnover, discourage employees and frustrate customers.  Good leaders will achieve good results. A good leader will have fewer turnovers, higher profitability, and more employee commitment.

Incremental improvements in good leaders will not, however, occur until the 70th, 80th, or 90th percentile.  Extraordinary leaders will consistently achieve results that far exceed those of the good leaders.  They will create even less turnover, motivate employees to a much higher degree, and satisfy customers to a much higher level.

These studies clearly demonstrate the significant difference an extraordinary leader makes on bottom-line results and confirm that if leaders can move from the ‘good’ level to the ‘extraordinary’ level at a a reasonable cost to the organization, the return on that investment will be substantial.

IS “GOOD” GOOD ENOUGH

While the results for extraordinary leaders are much better than for poor leaders, the current problem is that too many good leaders feel that being ‘good’ is good enough.  They are satisfied that they are not poor leaders, and, therefore, remain unchallenged to go to the next level. Many of these good leaders do not recognize that continued improvement in leadership would make a substantial difference in the outcomes they are attempting to produce.  Many ‘adequate’ leaders stay where they are because they fail to understand the differences between good and extraordinary leaders.”

Personal comments:

Many remain in uncomfortable, unrewarding, stifling work environments due to the inability to find rewarding places to work.  It’s unfortunate that more Americans are not working; over 94,000,000 , a record.  Add those who work in places they would rather not, just to support themselves and their families, and the future looks bleaker.  Talked with a person recently who is working three jobs.  More typical that it should be!

To add to the misery, we have uncommitted, incapable and rampant poor leadership at all levels, and in all types of organizations with government “leading the way”!  Instead of working to improve their leadership abilities they hang on to their jobs because those they work for are incompetent, self-centered, and I could list all key elements I’ve written about to explain what they are not.

Good is not good enough.

Next: The Extraordinary Leader

Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders

WHAT CAUSES GOOD LEADERS TO BE UNCHALLENGED TO CHANGE

Authors quotes:

“Our purpose in presenting these studies is to impress on the reader that the impact of leadership:

-Affects every measurable dimension of organization performance

-Is large, not trivial

-Is extremely consistent

-Has highly interrelated areas of impact

Poor leaders have a substantial influence on an organization’s success.  They consistently achieve less effective results, create greater turnover, discourage employees and frustrate customers.  Good leaders will achieve good results. A good leader will have fewer turnovers, higher profitability, and more employee commitment.

Incremental improvements in good leaders will not, however, occur until the 70th, 80th, or 90th percentile.  Extraordinary leaders will consistently achieve results that far exceed those of the good leaders.  They will create even less turnover, motivate employees to a much higher degree, and satisfy customers to a much higher level.

These studies clearly demonstrate the significant difference an extraordinary leader makes on bottom-line results and confirm that if leaders can move from the ‘good’ level to the ‘extraordinary’ level at a a reasonable cost to the organization, the return on that investment will be substantial.

IS “GOOD” GOOD ENOUGH

While the results for extraordinary leaders are much better than for poor leaders, the current problem is that too many good leaders feel that being ‘good’ is good enough.  They are satisfied that they are not poor leaders, and, therefore, remain unchallenged to go to the next level. Many of these good leaders do not recognize that continued improvement in leadership would make a substantial difference in the outcomes they are attempting to produce.  Many ‘adequate’ leaders stay where they are because they fail to understand the differences between good and extraordinary leaders.”

Personal comments:

Many remain in uncomfortable, unrewarding, stifling work environments due to the inability to find rewarding places to work.  It’s unfortunate that more Americans are not working; over 94,000,000 , a record.  Add those who work in places they would rather not, just to support themselves and their families, and the future looks bleaker.  Talked with a person recently who is working three jobs.  More typical that it should be!

To add to the misery, we have uncommitted, incapable and rampant poor leadership at all levels, and in all types of organizations with government “leading the way”!  Instead of working to improve their leadership abilities they hang on to their jobs because those they work for are incompetent, self-centered, and I could list all key elements I’ve written about to explain what they are not.

Good is not good enough.

Next: The Extraordinary Leader

Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders

WHAT CAUSES GOOD LEADERS TO BE UNCHALLENGED TO CHANGE

Author: maxbinkley

Creator of Leadership to the Max My experience in the military helped set the career path for me in human resources. After the military I worked for The Dow Chemical Company and left there in 1993 to venture out on my own. I purchased a small business, then a franchise then started another business in semi-retirement.

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