The Extraordinary Leader, Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders, SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS (14. 15, 16), Final Post

 

LEADING ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE

“14. Developing strategic perspectives

High Performers:

-Know how work relates to the organization’s business strategy

-Translate the organization’s vision and objectives into challenging and meaningful goals for others

-Can take the long view; can be trusted to balance short-term and long-term needs of the organization

Poor performers:

-Get caught up in the “day-to-day” and fail to take a longer-term, broader perspective on business decisions

15. Championing change

High performers:

-Become champions for projects or programs, presenting them so that others support them

-Are effective marketers for work groups’ projects, programs or products

Poor performers:

-Tend to follow the lead of others in change efforts

16. Connect internal groups with the outside world

High performers:

-Have demonstrated ability to represent the work group to key groups outside the group/department
-Help people understand how meeting customer’s needs is central to the mission and goals of the organization

Poor performers:

-Make day-to-day decisions based on internal needs rather than the needs of customers

-Do not have a broad network outside their own work group

Final comments:

Revisiting good/bad memories over my career has been worthwhile.  Worthwhile since it helps me focus on those who made my career enjoyable.  There are too many to mention, but they will continue to reappear in my memories with fondness.  Wishing the same for you.

Max

The Extraordinary Leader, Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders, SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS (8, 9, 10, 12, 13 )

 

Interpersonal Skills

“9. Communicating powerfully and prolifically

High performers:

-Are skillful at communicating new insights

-Provide the work group with a definite sense of direction and purpose

-Help people understand how work contributes to the broader business objectives

Poor performers:

-Do a poor job of communicating plans to people who help implement them

-Fail to explain the purpose and/or importance of the assignments

10. Inspiring and motivating others to high performance

High performers:

-Energize people to go the extra mile

-Have the ability to get people to stretch and reach goals beyond what they originally thought was possible

Poor performers:

-Fail to inspire commitment, high energy, and a winning attitude

11. Building relationships

High performers:

-Are trusted by work group members

-Balance concern for productivity and results with sensitivity for employee’ needs/problems

-Are approachable and friendly

-Handle difficult situations constructively and tactfully

Poor performers:

-Are difficult to get along with

-People don’t feel free to take their complaints to them

12. Developing others

High performers:

-Are genuinely concerned about the development of others’ careers

-Give individuals an appropriate balance of positive and corrective performance feedback

-Give honest feedback

-Take interest in the work of others

-Support others’ growth and success

Poor performers:

-Wait too long to give others feedback

-Try to keep good people rather than allowing them to take on developmental opportunities

13. Collaboration and teamwork

High performers:

-Have developed cooperative working relationships with others in the company

-Promote a spirit of cooperation with other members of the work group

-Ensure that the work unit works well with other groups and departments

Poor performers:

-Do not work well with people who have different backgrounds and perspectives

-Promote a spirit of competition with other work groups

Personal comments:

Personal experience (Behaviors 9-13):

-Communicating powerfully and prolifically

+Many of the staff members I worked with found my level of communication unnecessary, and unfortunately their lack of communication created more problems than solved them

-Fail to inspire commitment, high energy, and a winning attitude

+A “winning attitude” was not expressed.  Not a focus; more interested in finding fault

-Wait too long to give others feedback

+Waiting too long or more likely, not given

-Try to keep good people rather than allowing them to take on developmental opportunities

+Common problem that was expressed by employees, and difficult to correct resulting loss of a high quality employee leaving for the opportunity elsewhere

-Do not work well with people who have different backgrounds and perspectives

+Not appreciated often, by some staff members and employees

-Promote a spirit of competition with other work groups

+More fault finding than positive communication, or support

Next: The Extraordinary Leader

Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders

SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS (14. 15, 16)

Final Post

The Extraordinary Leader, Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders, SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS

 

SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS (COMPETENCIES) THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN HOW LEADERS ARE PERCEIVED BY OTHERS (4 through 8)

“4.  Innovation

High performers:

-Encourage alternative approaches and new ideas

-Consistently generate creative, resourceful solutions to problems

-Constructively challenge the usual approach of doing things and find new and better ways to do the job

-Create a culture of learning that drives individual development

-Work to improve new ideas rather than discourage them

-Encourage people to find innovative ways to accomplish their goals

Poor performers:

-Have a ‘one right way’ mindset

-Are afraid to challenge existing systems, processes, or approaches

-Feel that new or innovative approaches will cost too much to implement or cause disruption

-Shoot down new ideas or approaches

5. Practicing self-development:

High performers:

-Make constructive efforts to change and improve based on feedback from others

-Seek feedback from others to improve and develop themselves

-Constantly look for developmental opportunities (they are excited to learn)

Poor performers:

-Seem unconcerned about any kind of self-development

-Are content with their current skills and abilities

-Fear that others might perceive their development of new skills as a sign of incompetence or weakness

FOCUS ON RESULTS

6. Focus on results:

High performers:

-Aggressively pursue all assignments and projects until completion

-Do everything possible to meet goals or deadlines

Poor performers:

-Fail to achieve agreed-upon results within the time allotted

-Fail to achieve the goals set for their work

7. Establish stretch goals

High performers:

-Maintain high standards of performance

-Set measurable standards of excellence for themselves and others in the work group

-Promote a spirit of continuous improvement

Poor performers:

-Fail to build commitment among all employees to team goals and objectives

8. Take responsibility for outcomes/initiative

High performers:

-Take personal responsibilities for outcomes

-Can be counted on to follow through on commitment

-Go above and beyond what needs to be done without being told

Poor performers:

-Blame failures on others

-Lose interest before projects are completed and fail to follow through

Personal comments:

Being a high performer does have its risk.  High performers do have targets on their backs, with low performers.

Low performers don’t appreciate high performers (easy to figure out..), are good at gathering similar mindsets into a force to be reckoned with, and often influence (negatively) the CEO/president (especially when the CEO is also a low performer).

High performers may have to proceed at their own risk. It’s not easy fighting the “system”, but well worth it, if you know what I mean….

Personal note:

This blog made its debut in 2011.  It’s been enjoyable to write about my experiences, but now it has become more of a chore.  When I’ve finished commenting on these 16 behaviors this blog road will end.  It may start up again at a later date, and only time will tell. Best Regards.

Next: The Extraordinary Leader

Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders

SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS (continued)

The Extraordinary Leader, Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders, SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS

 

SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS (COMPETENCIES) THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN HOW LEADERS ARE PERCEIVED BY OTHERS

“Having presented our concerns about competencies and some suggestions about remedying this concerns along with an analysis of why the are so intricately  linked, we now present our own framework of competencies that make a difference.

How are impressions about leadership effectiveness mot powerfully created?  Our research shows that drawers noticed some competencies  much more than others.  We believe that emphasizing the differentiating competencies will help leaders create a more favorable impression.  Our research confirms that a real impact on employee turnover, customer satisfaction, and profitability occurs only when leadership is perceived a being extremely bad or exceptionally good.  Being horrid at a competency gets notices; being extraordinarily good gets noticed; but being average or good at something does not.  Hence, the need for our advice regarding fixing a fatal flaw.  If people have fatal flaw (some behavior or competency that is rated very negatively), this may be the main source of there negative impression.  In order to create a change in the Gestalt (general impression), people need to make noticeable changes.

What follows is a more details description of competencies, with further information about how people who score highly on that competency behave, and how people who receive low scores also behave on it.

CHARACTER

1. Displaying high integrity and honesty

High performers:

-Avoid saying one thing and doing another (i.e., walk the talk)

-Act consistently with their words

-Follow through on promises and commitments

-Model the core values

-Lead by example

Poor performers:

-Are threatened by others’ success

-Make themselves look good at the expense of other people

-Blame failures on others

PERSONAL CAPABILITY

2. Technical and professional expertise

High performers:

-Are sought out by others for advice and counsel

-Use technical knowledge to help team members troubleshoot problems

-Have credibility because of their in-depth knowledge of issues or problems

Poor performers:

-Do not understand the job well

-Are technically or professionally incompetent

-Have become out of date technically

-Fail to understand the technology/profession well

3. SOLVING PROBLEMS AND ANALYZING ISSUES

High performers:

-Exercise a high level of professional judgment

-Make good decisions based on a mixture of analysis, wisdom, experience, and judgment

-Encourage alternative approaches and new ideas

Poor performers:

-Fail to anticipate and stay on top of problems

-Do not consider an appropriate range of alternatives before making a decision”

Personal comments:

My most memorable experience was dealing with that felt threatened by me.  Many I worked with did not possess empathy (support, influence), and instead of teamwork developed roadblocks to team.

Personal note:

This blog made its debut in 2011.  It’s been enjoyable to write about my experiences, but now it has become more of a chore.  When I’ve finished commenting on these 16 behaviors this blog road will end.  It may start up again at a later date, and only time will tell. Best Regards.

Next: The Extraordinary Leader

Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders

SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS (continued)

The Extraordinary Leader, Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders, MAKING A LEADER, continued

 

Authors quotes:

“Focus on Results

Two elements, Focus on Results and Interpersonal Skills, require that Character and Personal Capability be in place, but it appears to make no difference which of these two components comes after that.  Indeed, there exists a remarkable relationship between these two components of leadership.  Here are some of the ways:

-Establish stretch goals for their people

-Take personal responsibility for outcomes of the group

-Provide ongoing feedback and coaching to their people

-Set loftier targets for the group to achieve

-Personally sponsor an initiative or action

-Initiate new programs, projects, processes, client relationships, or technology

-Focus on organizational goals and ensure that they are translated into actions by their departments

-Operate with speed and intensity

-Champion the cause of a customer

-Balance long-term and short-term objectives

Interpersonal Skills

The companion set of skills to Focus on Results required for effective leaders is ‘people skills’ or Interpersonal Skills.  These are extremely important to the success of any leader, especially since the demise of ‘command and control’ styles of leadership.  Interpersonal Skills includes more ‘differentiating competencies’ than any other cluster.

What are specific skills required of a leader with strong interpersonal skills?

-Inspiring others to high performance

-Building positive relationships with others

-Developing the skills and talents of subordinates

-Working in a collaborative manner with others

-Being an effective team member

-Recognizing and rewarding the contributions of others

-Being open and receptive to new ideas

-Responding positively to feedback

-Effectively resolving conflicts within their own department, and with other groups outside

-Influencing people upward in the organization, in addition to peers and subordinates

-Building the self-esteem of others, giving positive indications of their ability to succeed

-Teaching others in a helpful manner

Leading Organizational Change

What are the specific skills required for leading organization change?

-Has the ability to be a champion for change in the organization

-Leads projects or programs, presenting them so that others support them

-Is an effective marketer for his or her work group’s projects

-Has a strategic perspective

-Knows his or her work relates to the organization’s business strategy

-Translates the organization’s vision and objectives into challenging and meaningful work

-Takes the long view; can be trusted to balance short-term and long-term needs of the organization

-Connects the outside world with internal groups

-Represents work group to key groups outside the group or department

-Helps others understand how meeting customers’ needs is central to the mission and goals of the organization.

Personal comments:

An excellent list for comparing your past, and current bosses.  An overall grade of C would be my estimate for past bosses of mine.

Another excellent use of the list is to compare yourselves against these lists, and/or ask a trusted confident to give you feedback on you vs. the list.

Next: The Extraordinary Leader

Turning Good Managers Into Great Leaders

SIXTEEN BEHAVIORS