“How am I doing? The Case for Job Performance Reviews” personal stories

This week’s personal stories will focus on my earlier blog concerning job performance reviews, and about their history:

The history of these reviews is not a good one, from those who delivered them and from those who were on the receiving end of one. Those who delivered them were often disappointed, even shocked at times by the employee’s response. Those receiving them were, at times, surprised, shocked, and
disappointed. Quite often these reactions can be laid at the feet of managers: Continue reading ““How am I doing? The Case for Job Performance Reviews” personal stories”

“Basic Principles of Succeeding with People” personal stories (part two)

5. “They were fair (equity principle).”

Story: This is one area where trust is often violated. Time and time again I witnessed managers playing favorites with those who reported to them, allowing some employees to get away with behavior that was unacceptable for others. The equity principle is one of many reasons why managers need to develop Expectations, Job Descriptions, and Goals for employees. These steps will not eliminate the problem, but should help the manager think about their behavior before acting contrary to acceptable practices. Continue reading ““Basic Principles of Succeeding with People” personal stories (part two)”

“Basic Principles of Succeeding with People” personal stories (part one of two)

1. “They were trustworthy.”

Story: With those I have trusted I’ve felt freedom to express my feelings, discuss problems and solutions openly. When I found those I did not trust I felt hampered, isolated and unable to fix problems or even discuss them. Building trust is key to developing any relationship, and without it little can be achieved. Continue reading ““Basic Principles of Succeeding with People” personal stories (part one of two)”

“What do Job Descriptions Accomplish?” personal stories

This personal story will be short since, in almost every situation, the story was the same.

If done correctly, job descriptions spell out what needs to be accomplished (top 10-12 job responsibilities) in order of importance. Now that sounds like a good idea, right? Well, not exactly. As you can probably figure out there are “advantages” in keeping language in a job description vague. For a matter of fact, some companies’ job descriptions were so “vague” I couldn’t find any. Talk about a travesty, especially for the employees. Continue reading ““What do Job Descriptions Accomplish?” personal stories”